Amended Return - Claim Teacher Credit, Efile

My daughter-in-law is/has been a school teacher since 2007. When she initially filed her Tax Year 2007 IRS return, she was unaware of the applicable teacher's tax credit. She filed that return as an E-File.
I want to assist her in filing a 1040-X, to amend her return and receive that missed tax credit. Alas, I have never amended a return that was initially filed as an E-File. She has requested/received a copy of her initial Efile submission.
Not being a tax "pro" - I sure do not want to mislead her, as she submits a 1040-X. Any specific guidance would be most appreciated.
Thanks - for any/all advice
-Dave
PS-Sorry if my request is not reflective of the many "challenging" return questions, I see already answered on this forum !
-- Posted via NewsDemon.com - Premium Uncensored Newsgroup Service      ------->>>>>>http://www.NewsDemon.com <<<<<<------ Unlimited Access, Anonymous Accounts, Uncensored Broadband Access
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You should have a copy of the tax return that was efiled. If not, you can get a free transcript, enough to be able to amend, by filing Form 4506-T.
--

ArtKamlet at a o l dot c o m Columbus OH K2PZH

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a question about this.
If line 9, form 4506-T is "12/31/06", will that result in receiving data for 2006 returns, including any amended 2006 returns?
I'm in a situation of having most of the data for a past 2006 1040X I filed; the only thing I'm missing is the date I filed it (I signed/mailed it without re-photocopying it, and without making a note of the date.)
Or could perhaps I learn the date of filing simply by calling the IRS? (That sounds too simple...)
Steve
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you need to know that? If you need only the transcript for tax year 2006, since almost everyone files for the tax year ending 12/31/06, that's enough information.
--

ArtKamlet at a o l dot c o m Columbus OH K2PZH

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So your answer to my question above is in the affirmative -- if I enter the date 12/31/06, and select form 1040 as the transcript to be retrieved, the amended return will be included in the data retrieved?
Thanks,
Steve
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And choose line 6b, which included amended information.
--

ArtKamlet at a o l dot c o m Columbus OH K2PZH

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Art -- thanks.
Steve
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The benefit for educators is a deduction, not a credit. You really should crunch the numbers first from the receipts the taxpayer has to support this deduction. Be sure its worth doing prior to preparing and submitting the amended tax returns.
Depending on the state, you may also be filing an amended tax return for this deduction.
___________________________________ <<< Benjamin Yazersky, CPA [NJ & NY] >>> -----> real address on hobokeni or hobokenx <-----
"This written advice was not intended or written to be used, and it cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer."
(The foregoing legend has been affixed pursuant to U.S. Treasury Regulations governing tax practice.)
The information transmitted is intended only for the person or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and delete the material from any computer.
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 13:09:54 EDT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's not clear what you are concerned about. You said she already has a copy of her e-filed return, as Art Kamlet said you should. With that in hand, amending an e-filed return is no different from amending a paper-filed return, which you apparently have done before.
The 1040-X cannot be e-filed, even though the original return was e-filed. A 1040-X always has to be filed by mail.
If she used tax software to file her original return, she may be able to use the same software to prepare the amended return. That would save a lot of reentering of data and reduce the chance of error. It would also make it easy to "crunch the numbers first," as Benjamin Yazersky suggested, to see how much benefit she gets from the deduction.
Bob Sandler
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't know about a teacher's tax credit, perhaps you are referring to the educator expense deduction, which is a subtraction from taxable income of up to $250 of unreimbursed classroom expenses for a K-12 school teacher. (California used to have a teacher retention credit, but it was eliminated a few years back...)
Because this is an adjustment (deduction), the actual tax savings to her will be on the order of $25-$70, depending on her tax bracket. Your state may or may not have a similar benefit.

Any amended return must be paper filed, it makes no difference how the original was filed, so if that is your only concern, carry on. However, if you have never filed any amended returns before, you will need to spend some time reading the instructions.
Since the original return was e-filed, that means it was probably created using software. The software itself should provide a feature for creating an amendment, and that would be the easiest and most accurate way to go.
If that doesn't work for you, however, get a blank form 1040 for 2007, start copying numbers from the original return, put in the adjustment (line 23), and then recalculate the tax on page 2. Use this information to generate the numbers for columns B and C of the amended return.
As you mention "in-law", presumably this is a joint return and her husband will have to sign the amendment also. It will probably take a minimum of several months for the IRS to process.
-Mark Bole
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been a tax pro for some 26+ years and I have never heard of a Teacher's Tax Credit. I suspect you're referring to the Income Adjustment Item of $250 for Educator Expenses, assuming I'm correct, consider this -
1 - a $250 reduction in income will mean somewhere between $25 and $82 in tax savings - not much really;
2 - ALL Amended Returns are reviewed by a real live person - original returns, especially e-filed ones, are computer processed. You need to be aware of this because if she missed the educator deduction she may have missed something else too. And filing an amended return all but guarantees that the entire return will be looked at prior to any refund being issued. This is particularly noteworthy because many taxpayers have either refinanced their homes or they have equity loans on them - and most of the self prepared tax returns have missed the AMT adjustments for interest not related to the acquisition or improvement of the home. We're seeing a lot of IRS reviews of amended returns checking on this item. If these folks have such a loan they need to make sure that they treated the interest correctly before they amend as the IRS will likely at least ask about it. The taxpayer could find that amending this return results in them owing AMT to the IRS rather than getting a small refund.
3 - Depending on the state, you may need to also amend the state return;
4 - if the original return was married filing jointly, then the amended return needs to be filed jointly as well.
Frankly, I'm not sure I'd recommend amending these returns if the only issue is the missed educator deduction - the cost benefit analysis indicates that it may be more trouble than it is worth, especially if there are any aggressive positions on the return. Make no mistake, I am NOT afraid to amend, especially if the records are immaculate.
As a tax pro, it would cost more for me to amend this return than the taxpayer would get - of course, had a pro done the original return this item would likely not have been missed.
Good luck, Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 Jul 2009 14:40:17 EDT, "Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA"

Fist -- Thanks to all whom have taken the time to provide me with tax guidance !!
As has been noted, I incorrectly identified the "missed deduction", ergo I should have stated "Income Adjustment Item of

Further, I can understand the concern possible audits raise, as noted each 1040 X is reviewed by an agent. In my (now) daughter in law's case, she was single in 2007. She had net earnings under $25k, in the state of Maine. For sure there were no items likely to raise ANY concern.
Thanks for ALL of the Assistance !!
-- Posted via NewsDemon.com - Premium Uncensored Newsgroup Service      ------->>>>>>http://www.NewsDemon.com <<<<<<------ Unlimited Access, Anonymous Accounts, Uncensored Broadband Access
--
<< ------------------------------------------------------- >>
<< The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BeanSmart.com is a site by and for consumers of financial services and advice. We are not affiliated with any of the banks, financial services or software manufacturers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.

Tax and financial advice you come across on this site is freely given by your peers and professionals on their own time and out of the kindness of their hearts. We can guarantee neither accuracy of such advice nor its applicability for your situation. Simply put, you are fully responsible for the results of using information from this site in real life situations.