I'm starting a new venture...

And I want to make sure I have all of my ducks in a row.
The big points: 1. This will be a heavy/civil construction firm, doing both private and public work.
2. I have only rudimentary training in accounting; maybe I should have listed that first. 3. The firm I currently work for has hundreds of employees and a pretty slick job costing system (at least it seems so to me). 4. The new firm will have probably 1 or 2 employees initially, and we hope to grow to a full crew at the end of our first year. 5. We are planning to have in our "money going out" list the following: disbursements to owners, payroll, subcontractors, payments for materials and overhead-type expenses (phones, office stuff, etc.)
The big questions: 1. Without many jobs (and many cost codes) active at once, this being a new firm and all, can I just make some kind of Excel workbook for each job, and then import that into a larger, purpose-built job costing software? Or is this just more headache than it's worth? 2. Am I overthinking this? Should I sit down and consult with an accounting professional to see exactly what it is I need? The problem here is that I don't even know what I don't know. 3. My knee-jerk reaction is Quickbooks or something like it because it seems to be the industry standard, but will it have all the stuff I need? Will I spend $250 on that, only to spend $5K AND have to re- enter the entire check register and invoice history?
I'm not trolling here. I just would like some general guidelines as to what direction I should be pointing in, and accountants seem to be the best group of folks to which I should ask accounting questions.
Thank you, ladies and gentlemen.
Phil Crow TItan of Industry
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