estimated tax question

I recently sold a bunch of I-Bonds that has generated a substantial income for the year.
Should I be paying estimated taxes on this? If so, what is the best way to go about doing this?
I used turbo tax for my 2017 return. Can I use that to generate a form to pay estimated taxes?
I was thinking of sending in a single lump sum of 50% of the income which should be enough to cover most of my investment income taxes for the year (not just what was generated from the sale of I-Bonds).
Thanks.
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This probably seems awfully retro but you can just fill out the form, print it, and mail it in with a check.
https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040es.pdf
If you have an EFTPS account you can log in and pay it all online.

The form 1040-ES PDF includes a worksheet to figure out how much to pay. Generally speaking you have to make timely payments of the lesser of 90% of what you owe or 100% of what you owed last year.
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John Levine, snipped-for-privacy@iecc.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies",
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On Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 2:35:59 PM UTC-7, John Levine wrote:

I think this is good.

I don't have this.

This is really tough because between investment income and variable pay at work, there are huge changes year to year.
I think I will just print out voucher #2 from above and send in a fairly conservative payment that should cover my tax liability for the year (based on what I have been owing in past years and adjusting for current interest rates and redemption of I-Bonds). That should hopefully prevent any penalties from being levied and if any are levied, it would be small.
Looking at last year's return I paid $17.00 in penalty. Am I overthinking this? I am concerned that the penalty this year could end up being in the hundreds or more.
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Yes, you are definitely overthinking it. You can avoid all penalties for 2018 by making sure that all your withholdings and estimated taxes add up to at least 100% of the tax shown on your 2017 return (110% if your gross income is over $150,000, or $75,000 for a married individual filing separately). It doesn't matter how much you will actually owe for 2018.
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On 5/10/2018 10:13, anoop wrote:

You can pay electronically without EFTPS account.
https://www.irs.gov/payments/direct-pay
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Without our knowing your other income and deductions for the current year and how much tax you will have paid in without the estimated tax that you're considering, and knowing how much tax you were liable for in the prior year, it's not possible for us to advise whether or not it's a good idea for you to be sending in estimated taxes because of the taxable profit on whatever it was that you sold.
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