Involuntary withdrawal from 401(k)

My question is how to avoid the consequences of a 401(k) distribution in cash that I didn't ask for.
Background: traditional (non-Roth) 401(k) with Principal Financial.
I'll reach age 70 this year (70½ next year). I retired in March of this year. In September I initiated a 100% direct rollover from the 401(k) to my Vanguard traditional IRA. Principal said they mailed the check on 30 Sept, though I suspect they were fudging since Vanguard didn't get it till 8 days later.
Separately, on 3 October, Principal cut a check for $1.96, which was gross amount of $2.44 less 20% withholding of $0.40. Note that this was _after_ they had processed my rollover. They mailed this to me, not Vanguard, made payable to me, not Vanguard. The accompanying letter says "This represents an additional contribution to your account. Additional contributions under $200 are paid in cash." I assume it's dividends or interest paid at end of month on the mutual finds.
It was not my intent to take any IRA distribution this year, but now I have $2.44 of distribution. Admittedly the amount is small, but it's really the extra accounting that I'd like to avoid.
I haven't contacted Principal to get them to redo this as a rollover, but I can't imagine they'd agree to that.
I understand that I can't undo the 40 cents withholding, but will have to claim it next April. (Or not claim it, since it rounds to zero dollars.)
Questions: Can I undo the distribution by transferring $2.44 from my bank account to my Vanguard IRA? If I do that, will it have any bad consequences, such as impacting my contribution limit to my Roth IRA? (This being the last year of working, I intend to contribute the full allowed $7000.)
Or am I better off just to say "what's done is done" and list it as a taxable distribution on my 1040 lines 4a and 4b?
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
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So long as it hasn't been 60 days since they sent the check, you should be able to send $2.44 to your IRA and treat it as a rollover. I would think you can skip the 40c on your taxes.
--
Regards,
John Levine, snipped-for-privacy@taugh.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies",
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On 10/10/19 10:16 AM, Stan Brown wrote:

Claiming the distribution will cost you far less in total time and effort than trying to make this right. There are times that it's just better to say goodbye to $xx than to keep going. I don't always live by those words, but I'll never spend 30 minutes on hold to fix a $2 problem, or spend 20 minutes in the car and $5 in gas to fix a $10 problem. Is the accounting that bad?
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On 10/11/2019 7:31 AM, JoeTaxpayer wrote:

And that $2.44 will have to be distributed some day anyway, so what is the real savings?
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On Thu, 10 Oct 2019 10:16:12 EDT, Stan Brown wrote:

[snipped]

Thanks to both John and Joe for responding. I had been swinging around to Joe's view even before I saw his article -- sometimes it's just not worth the effort to fix something small.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
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