Two jobs one tax code

Can anyone tell me whether there is any benefit to me splitting my tax code between two jobs?
Currently I am a basic rate tax payer and my tax code is with employer A.
Last year I earned the most with this employer, but I am being taxed at BR with employer B who this year it is likely I will earn the most with.
Does it matter whether or not I have one tax code or two because it will all work out the same in the end (PAYE)?
I have been advised to contact the IR and request that my tax code be split between both jobs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As long as you earn at least 7000 in each job, and less than 37,000 in total, it won't make any difference which job is your "main" job (ie the one with a normal tax code).
If you earn less than 7000 in one of your jobs and more than 7000 in the other, then you should register the higher paid job as your main job and have the BR code for your lower paid job, otherwise you'll pay too much tax (although you can of course claim a refund - but that's more form filling).
--
Andy



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

A normal tax code such as 489L does not just give you your allowances .... it also gives you the benefit of the 10% tax band. Accordingly if your current codes of say 489L and BR were adjusted to say 295L and 294L you would get the benefit of the 10% tax band twice and thus end up paying too little tax.
Accordingly I would not expect HMRC agreeing to a request from you "splitting my tax code between two jobs?". Well certainly not without counteracting the effect of that double use of the 10% band.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

Quite. It's better to be paying a little too much tax during the year and to get some back at the end, than paying too little and having to pay more at the end of the year, and not having any left.
If the job which uses the 489L code pays at least £(4895+2090) then it doesn't actually matter whether the BR code job pays more or less, the amount of tax taken should be correct. Only if the 489L job pays less than £6985 will the BR code cause too much tax to be deducted from pay, but this will be corrected through the tax return.
Rather than splitting the code, it might be more appropriate to swap them over with effect from next year, so that the "bigger" job uses the proper code (503L?) and the "smaller" one uses the BR code.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BeanSmart.com is a site by and for consumers of financial services and advice. We are not affiliated with any of the banks, financial services or software manufacturers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.

Tax and financial advice you come across on this site is freely given by your peers and professionals on their own time and out of the kindness of their hearts. We can guarantee neither accuracy of such advice nor its applicability for your situation. Simply put, you are fully responsible for the results of using information from this site in real life situations.