Cost of Goods Sold


As I'd learned it, the cost of goods sold is the depletion of merchandise
inventory, which includes what the store paid for the goods plus any
insurance, shipping, and other related costs.
But what about the plastic bags, cash register tape, and other consumables
that aren't goods for sale but are associated with the sale of things?
Are they simply called cost of goods sold?
Reply to
Gregory L. Hansen
On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 17:05:32 +0000 (UTC), in alt.accounting in :
The account names vary, but they are considered sales supplies and they are included in direct selling costs.
Reply to
David Jensen
Those items are not included because they have nothing to do with the purchase or preparation of the merchandise offered for sale.
Bags and cash register tape could be considered store supplies or a selling expense.
Reply to
Joe Canuck
In the quick-service segment of the restaurant industry, certain paper products are included in the cost of good section. These items would include; paper to wrap burgers, paper cups for drinks, and paper containers for fries. In the casual dining segment or higher level of service, the only thing included in cost of food sold is actual consummable food items. Thomas Hill, CHAE Hospitality Accountant
Reply to
tkntexas
Following will answer your question and give you the reasons why this is done this way. 1) Companies are in business to make money. The money they make comes from the profit of the goods they are selling. In a trading company, this profit (Gross Profit) is the difference between the prices billed to the customers (Sales or Revenue) and the prices they are paying to their vendors, and all other costs that are incurred in the trading transaction such as packaging, freight, cargo insurance etc. (cost of goods sold) In a company that is manufacturing the products they are selling the profit (Gross Profit) is the difference between the prices billed to the customer (Sales or Revenue) and all the cost that they incur to produce these products such as payroll, social securities, raw material, packaging. (Cost of goods sold) The profits that result from the trading of the goods (Gross Profits) are reduced by the operating costs. These are all other expenses that the company incurs for other then costs that are directly related to individual sales transactions. This includes administration expenses, back office expenses, accounting expenses, advertising etc. This clear separation between Cost of Sales and Operating Expenses allows the company to identify the profits they achieved from trading (Gross Profit) and the expenses they incurr to operate the company.
Reply to
Acc
Following will answer your question and give you the reasons why this is done this way. 1) Companies are in business to make money. The money they make comes from the profit of the goods they are selling. In a trading company, this profit (Gross Profit) is the difference between the prices billed to the customers (Sales or Revenue) and the prices they are paying to their vendors, and all other costs that are incurred in the trading transaction such as packaging, freight, cargo insurance etc. (cost of goods sold) In a company that is manufacturing the products they are selling the profit (Gross Profit) is the difference between the prices billed to the customer (Sales or Revenue) and all the cost that they incur to produce these products such as payroll, social securities, raw material, packaging. (Cost of goods sold) The profits that result from the trading of the goods (Gross Profits) are reduced by the operating costs. These are all other expenses that the company incurs for other then costs that are directly related to individual sales transactions. This includes administration expenses, back office expenses, accounting expenses, advertising etc. This clear separation between Cost of Sales and Operating Expenses allows the company to identify the profits they achieved from trading (Gross Profit) and the expenses they incurr to operate the company.
Reply to
Acc

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