How does Citibank "sell all or part of itself"?

On MSNBC today, they mentioned that Citibank, C, can sell all or part of itself. They also say that "an outright sale shouldn't be ruled out." What do they mean by this, since C is a publicly traded company
that's already sold itself to the public a long time ago?
HERE IS A PART OF THE ARTICLE: The New York-based bank is scheduled to hold a board meeting Friday to discuss whether to sell all or part of itself, the Wall Street Journal reported.
Citigroups shares tumbled below $4 a share to their lowest level in more than 15 years, continuing a sharp, week-long plunge that could not be stemmed by Saudi investor Prince Alwaleed bin Talals decision Thursday to raise his stake in the company to 5 percent from less than 4 percent.
The shares have shed 60 percent of their value since last Friday.
An outright sale shouldnt be ruled out, but it appears unlikely, said Alois Pirker at Aite Group. Not only are there few potential buyers right now, but firms prefer to cherry pick, he said. If you dont have a well integrated shop, the benefit of taking over the whole versus pieces diminishes.
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wrote:

The stock holders will have to agree to a sale. Public traded companies are sold all the time.
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Ohhh!!!! Do you mean that C would solicit other companies to acquire it via a stock purchase takeover? So the only way that they can survivie is by being acquired, since they don't have the cash flows to pay for their immediate liquidity needs?
If C is trying to invite other companies for a takeover, why don't GM allow Honda or Toyota to do the same? After all, the market cap of GM is only $2B and they have $35B in long term debt, BUT they have $20B in cash. The true cost of this company is $17B. This company can be streamlined, I think. However, much of their liabilities need to be waived, which can only be done via bankruptcy.
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2.7182818284590... wrote:

It's not clear what sort of teaming agreements were in place, but GM has resold Toyota designs for a while. So there's some sort of financial arrangement.
The answer is that Toyota probably wants to sell under its marque. It probably doesn't need the resources, so "buy what" becomes the question.

Government knows it'll end up paying for those liabilities.
-- Les Cargill
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I understand that toyota/honda buy parts from GM. They could aquire the parts division.
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On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 11:57:48 -0500, Les Cargill wrote:

I think this should make it pretty clear to most rational people that the private sector should not be in the health insurance or pension business. There are few if any private companies that can stand the test of time and actually deliver the pensions they promise.
American business must get completely out of pensions and health insurance. This is the only "jewel" in McSame's plans and it was only a agate. It offered a way to remove health insurance from any employer.
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Michael Coburn wrote:

It's anything but. Blue Cross came about in the late '40s as a "perk" when government froze wages. It's entirely due to government meddling since.
And the trades made for single-payer healthcare are stark indeed.

I'm pretty sure we all know we're on our own. The defined benefit pension is ancient history.

And it was probably very broken - I never actually ran the numbers.
-- Les Cargill
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It can be by stock purchase or stock swaps.

Thats just one possibility.

Because they would rather the govt hands them $25B instead.

Its much more complicated than that.

Any company can. Whether that will be enough to stop them going bust is another matter entirely.
One very fundamental problem with car companys is that once it looks like they might well be about to go bust, hardly anyone is silly enough to buy their cars, because they may have a problem with getting parts when they need them, and the resale value of the car will be very bad if the company has gone bust by the time you need to sell the car or trade it in.

Thats just plain wrong. Other operations can buy bits of their operation.
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If they sell part of their current operation, they get money for that part they sell, and that cash becomes part of their assets.
It they sell the whole lot, the shareholders get the money.

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Citigroup Inc. is a body corporate which under the law is treated almost like a natural person with rights to own assets and enter into contracts in accordance with a set of powers and rules known as the memorandum and articles of association adopted by its shareholders. 'C' is Citigroup's NYSE symbol; Citibank is probably one of its subsidiaries, a corporation owned by it.
A publicly traded company listed on the NYSE has its tradeable shares registered with the NYSE as tradeable shares. A company selling itself may either its shareholders sell their shares, or the company may be issuing new shares, to some other party or parties, The word 'sell' maybe used loosely to also mean the shares are exchanged for the shares in the other party if it is another corporation, in which case the 'selling' corporation becomes a subsidary of the 'takeover' corporation.
Just like a natural person, a corporation may own assets, e.g., in the form of business division, or shares in subsidiary corporations which in turn own their own assets. These assets are parts of itself which the corporation may sell.
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