invoicing irregularities covered by GAAP?

Hi,
I am not an accountant but a programmer, I am in a situation where I am was wondering if the following situation would be covered by GAAP:
We have invoices being exchanged electronically between trading
partners with a particular calculation model, let us say
price of item * amount of item purchased = cost of purchase line
but someone else wants to do
price of item * (amount of item purchased / cost of unit) = cost of purchase line.
The person who wants to do this change wants to allow people to choose which method they use to calculate out their invoices without specifying which it is.
The suggested solution is when receiving an invoice, calculate using method 1, if method returns correct amount process else calculate using method 2.
The obvious problem here is that (theoretically) someone could have calculated incorrectly with method 1 and return an amount incorrect by method 1 but an amount correct by method 2. Or that someone could calculate using a third method and have a higher chance of returning a correct result by one of the approved methods.
This seems to me to be too low level and atomic a process to be covered by GAAP rules but I could be wrong. Are there any generally accepted accounting principles about this kind of thing that says don't allow vagueness as to how an individual amount was arrived at into global amounts?
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On 24 Sep 2006 01:48:19 -0700, "pantagruel"

Are you sure that is correct? The difference between the two is the division of the cost of unit.

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Yes it is correct that the difference between the two is the cost of the unit.
The problem I have is a programmatic one that I cannot logically tell if an amount is incorrectly calculated. if the amount is calculated by one method and given incorrectly it could end up being the result of the second amount. I don't know how likely this is, I suppose not likely but how does one prove the likelihood. since I don't want to encounter this problem I was hoping there were accounting rules saying one had to use the same calculation model for all documents of a particular type, meaning I cannot calculate my first invoice per one way and my second invoice per another way. Thus if I get an invoice from someone and I need to calculate if it is correct I need to use the same way all times I do such a calculation.
Thanks. Peter Saxton wrote:

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wrote:

I'm sorry I don't understand. Something can't have two different answers. At least one must be wrong.
You need to decide which is correct and use that.
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No, the situation is not covered by "GAAP" but yes, you can figure invoices in a different manner for the same (or different) customers. And if the amount remitted is not equal to the accounts receivable balance then that would "prove the likelihood" of a difference" !

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