Proving that the corporations 32% in taxes, and employee costs are minimal (~10%)

"Ayatollah Obama"
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http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2003/12/images/20031216-9_d121603-3-515h.html or http://tinyurl.com/5at834 Straight from the bush,jr White House.
For the past five years low income purchasers could buy with NO equity in the home. If they go under water they simply abandon the house and the bank eats the mortgage. ======================================================== http://tinyurl.com/5at834 Took bush,jr 11minutes to bury America
President Bush Signs American Dream Downpayment Act of 2003 Remarks by the President at Signing of the American Dream Downpayment Act Department of Housing and Urban Development Washington, D.C.
1:57 P.M. EST
THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all. Thank you for coming. Thanks for the warm welcome. It's great to be back at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This is not my first time here, nor will it be my last. (Applause.) I am here today because we are taking action to bring many thousands of Americans closer to owning a home. Our government is supporting homeownership because it is good for America, it is good for our families, it is good for our economy.
One of the biggest hurdles to homeownership is getting money for a down payment. This administration has recognized that, and so today I'm honored to be here to sign a law that will help many low-income buyers to overcome that hurdle, and to achieve an important part of the American Dream.
I appreciate Alphonso Jackson agreeing to step up and become the Acting Secretary of the Housing and Urban Development. I look forward to his Senate confirmation, a hasty confirmation. (Applause.)
I also want to thank Mel Martinez for doing such a fine job as the Secretary of this important organization. Mel brought integrity and honor to the office. He did a fine job on behalf of all Americans. And we honor you, Mel. (Applause.)
I want to thank all the hardworking officers and employees of HUD. I appreciate your focus and your dedication, your willingness to work on behalf of a better America. (Applause.) I thank very much members of the Congress who have taken time to come and join us for this important bill signing. Senator Wayne Allard from Colorado is with us. Senator Allard, thank you for your work on the floor of the Senate. (Applause.) Chairman of the Financial Services Committee, Mike Oxley, is with us. Congressman, thank you for coming. (Applause.) Congressman Jim Leach from Iowa is with us today. Congressman, thank you for being here. (Applause.) Congresswoman Katherine Harris, who had a lot to do with this bill getting passed, is here with us. Katherine, thank you for coming. (Applause.) Delegate Madeleine Bordallo of Guam is with us today. I'm honored you are here. Thank you for coming, Madeleine. I appreciate you coming. (Applause.)
I, too, want to pay homage to a man I call "Little Woody" -- that would be Rob Woodson. He worked hard in the development of this policy. I think it is safe to say that he was the -- he developed the concept for this policy, a concept embraced by my administration. I'm appreciative that Michelle is here. I also want to thank Dad for coming -- Bob Woodson, who is a social entrepreneur, a person who cares deeply about every American having the right and a chance to own a home. Thank the Woodson family. God bless you all. (Applause.)
I want to thank the representatives of the consumer and housing groups that worked hard on this piece of legislation. I want to thank leaders of the national community organizations that are with us, and members of the real estate industry.
This administration will constantly strive to promote an ownership society in America. We want more people owning their own home. It is in our national interest that more people own their own home. After all, if you own your own home, you have a vital stake in the future of our country. And this is a good time for the American homeowner. Today we received a report that showed that new home construction last month reached its highest level in nearly 20 years. (Applause.)
The reason that is so is because there is renewed confidence in our economy. Low interest rates help. They have made owning a home more affordable, for those who refinance and for those who buy a home for the first time. Rising home values have added more than $2.5 trillion to the assets of the American family since the start of 2001.
The rate of homeownership in America now stands a record high of 68.4 percent. Yet there is room for improvement. The rate of homeownership amongst minorities is below 50 percent. And that's not right, and this country needs to do something about it. We need to -- (applause.) We need to close the minority homeownership gap in America so more citizens have the satisfaction and mobility that comes from owning your own home, from owning a piece of the future of America.
Last year I set a goal to add 5.5 million new minority homeowners in America by the end of the decade. That is an attainable goal; that is an essential goal. And we're making progress toward that goal. In the past 18 months, more than 1 million minority families have become homeowners. (Applause.) And there's more that we can do to achieve the goal. The law I sign today will help us build on this progress in a very practical way.
Many people are able to afford a monthly mortgage payment, but are unable to make the down payment. So this legislation will authorize $200 million per year in down payment assistance to at least 40,000 low-income families. These funds will help American families achieve their goals, and at the same time, strengthen our communities.
And there's more to do, as well. We'll continue to pursue a broad agenda to help people own a home. There are three steps I want to describe to you right quickly about what we intend to do. First, those who apply for mortgages should be made aware of all the costs and warned about predatory lenders who take advantage of inexperienced buyers. So we've doubled the funds for housing counseling services, including those run by faith-based and community groups.
We understand that buying a home for the first time is complicated, and we want to simplify the process. We want to help people understand the pros and cons of buying a home. We want people to be fully aware of what it means to buy a home and what it takes. And we want people as best protected as possible from those shysters who would take advantage of first-time buyers. (Applause.)
Second, we need to make the home-buying process more affordable. Some of the biggest up-front costs in a home purchase are the closing costs. Sometimes they catch you by surprise. (Laughter.) Many home buyers do not have the time to shop around looking for a better deal on closing costs. You're kind of stuck with what you're presented with. And so they end up paying more than they should. So we've proposed new rules to make it easier for buyers to shop around and to compare prices on closing costs, so they can get the best deal and the best service possible.
And thirdly, we want to make buying a home simpler. Many first-time buyers look at the paperwork from a loan application, and frankly, get a little nervous about all the fine print. Those forms can be intimidating to the first-time home buyer. They can be intimidating to the second or third-time home buyer, too. (Laughter and applause.) So this administration has proposed new rules to simplify the forms home buyers and homeowners fill out when they apply for a loan or close on a mortgage.
We understand that buying a home is a big step, and so these three recommendations we're making, these three changes in the rules will make that step easier; will enable people to make the step to buying a home -- they'll be able to do so with more confidence. These are practical ways that we are working to expand homeownership across the country.
The dream of homeownership should be attainable for every hardworking American. That's what we want. In this act of Congress I'm going to sign, the regulations that I hope are finalized soon will help thousands of families fulfill the dream.
And so now it my honor, right here at this important Department, the Department responsible for encouraging homeownership in America, to sign the American Dream Downpayment Act. (Applause.)
(The bill is signed.) (Applause.)
END 2:08 P.M. EST
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Nope, I don't think so. I think that it is you uberlib DemonCraps that fail to grasp the concept that people want to keep and spend the money they make for themselves. It is you DemonCraps that think that Government has a RIGHT to the money that people make.
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By the same "logic", do you claim most individual income taxes are paid by employers, since "how does an individual come up with the money to pay its "taxes" if the money isn't collected from the employer?"
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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The point I am making is ALL taxes are paid by the individual. Either directly to the Government or via a business.
Corporate tax is a hidden tax on the consumer propogated and supported by DemonCraps.
You can either tax an individual at a 50% rate with no taxes on the Corporation, or tax them at 20% and make them pay via products they buy at a higher price. Taxing people via what they buy is slight of hand at best.
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On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 11:18:15 -0800, President Soetoro wrote:

Neither payment of taxes nor payment of dividends is a true cost of business operations. The disutility of taxes is not born by the operating company but split between shareholders and consumers. And how these are born is discussed as tax incidence.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tax_incidence
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On Nov 21, 2:18pm, President Soetoro

To be fair, XOM pays out ~42% of their pretax income as taxes.
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The very fundamental point you have missed is that corp taxes are paid on PROFITS, whereas employee costs are incurred even when not making a profit.

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Proving that the corporations 32% in taxes, and employee costs are minimal (~10%)
Today, I analyzed the 500 companies on the S&P 500 to quantify and qualify the index's metrics. Moreover, I also wanted to discern the weighted average gross margins, the weighted average pretax margins, as well as the weighted post tax margins (i.e. weighted net profit margins). Finally, I would also like to calculate the tax rate of the average S&P 500 company based on the differential of the weighted average pretax margins and the weighted average profit margins.
Here are my abbreviations that Im using: S = Sales (i.e. Revenue) COGS = Cost of goods sold WAGM = Weighted Average Gross Margin CSGADAI = Cost of Selling, General Administrative, Depreciation, Amortization, and Interest - Basically, this is all costs excluding the COGS and Taxes. All these costs are deducted from revenue, just like the COGS, to arrive at the Net Income (NI). WAPTM = Weighted Average Pre-Tax Margin COT = Cost of Taxes WANPM = Weighted Average Net Profit Margin NI = Net Income (i.e. Profit)
Regarding my liberal use of the term Weighted Average for my calculations as opposed to the Arithmetic Average: To understand this distinction, lets analyze the WANPM. The WANPM is calculated by summing the entire column of MS Excel which has the earnings of the companies. Note that some of the values maybe negative indicating a loss. The Earnings for each company is in Column E, and the Sales figures for each company is in Column J. Therefore, the WANPM is:
=SUM(E2:E501)/SUM(J2:J501)
Also, this method is more robust than simply averaging all the individual profit margins. As a comparison, the WANPM and the Arithmetic NPM are: 0.04924734 and 0.074364, respectively.
Using this WA approach, I figured out that the WAGM of the companies are: WAGM - WeightedGrossMargin 0.2739 WAPTM - WeightedPreTaxMargin 0.0728 WANPM - WeightedNetProfitMargin 0.0492
Therefore, the Income Statement for a representative company on the S&P 500 can be recreated who nominal revenue is $1. We have the following Income Statement, and at the end, we will solve the average tax rate for the representative company:
S 1.0000 (COGS) (0.7261) WAGM V WeightedAverageGrossMargin 0.2739 (CSGADAI) (0.2011) WAPTM - WeightedAveragePreTaxMargin 0.0728 (COT) (0.0236) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WANPM - WeightedAverageNetProfitMargin 0.0492
From a WAPTM of 0.0728, the company pays out 0.0236 in taxes. This implies that the average company pays 0.0236/0.07282.4% in corporate taxes.
Some insights that Id like to point out here is that the cost of the employees (i.e. the wages) is actually very small when compared to the other costs. The wages, which are a component of the CSGADAI, should only be about half of this entire figure, which would mean half of 0.2011, or about .10 the total revenues of a company. On the other hand, the COGS is .73. Therefore, it is not so valid to state that the wage costs or the tax costs are the biggest costs of a corporation.
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I think the 'cost of goods sold' probably includes some wages.
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It should.... COGS is fixed and variable costs
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Andy F.
You're 100% right. Both, COGS and SGA, seem to include the wages. I think that COGS is mostly used for manufacturers and SGA is mostly used for service oriented industries.
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