Quicken on Linux


My computer is in the process of dieing and I'm giving some thought to
moving to Linux instead of Win7... A big part of that is examining the
apps I use regularly and making sure there are reasonable alternatives on
Linux.. One huge problem in the past has been Quicken -- I assume Intuit
doesn't make a Linux version yet. ?? tnx /b\
Reply to
Bernie Cosell
You assume correctly nor does Quicken run as it should in Wine or Crossover Office as per their websites. It will, I believe, run in a Windows emulator but then why bother with Linux?
The lack of Intuit software (Quicken/TurboTax) has stopped me from going to Linux for several years now and it appears that there is no Linux port of Intuit software in the foreseeable future.
Unfortunately, for me Quicken/TurboTax are the only reasons I even own a computer.
Reply to
XS11E
That is correct. One replacement that I have implemented for a client using Ubuntu was GnuCash. It's usable but not the same thing.
Dual boot would be an option then why bother getting Linux.
Reply to
Laura
> My computer is in the process of dieing and I'm giving some thought to > moving to Linux instead of Win7... A big part of that is examining the > apps I use regularly and making sure there are reasonable alternatives on > Linux.. One huge problem in the past has been Quicken -- I assume Intuit > doesn't make a Linux version yet. ?? tnx /b\ > -- > Bernie Cosell Fantasy Farm Fibers > snipped-for-privacy@fantasyfarm.com Pearisburg, VA > --> Too many people, too few sheep
Reply to
Keith Snyder
}
} > My computer is in the process of dieing and I'm giving some thought to } > moving to Linux instead of Win7.. } > ...One huge problem in the past has been Quicken -- I assume Intuit } > doesn't make a Linux version yet. ?? tnx /b\ } } Correct. } } You can use GnuCash for your financial accounts. It is a sort of QuickBooks } and Quicken combined. GnuCash has a steep learning curve, nowhere near as } handy as Quicken. You have to study the tutorial. But it is usable.
Does GnuCash do the "connect" stuff? Being able easily and smoothly download my transactions is *very* important to me.
/B\
Reply to
Bernie Cosell
GnuCash does not import your Quicken files correctly, that might be even more important to you.
If you have a single checking account, GnuCash *might* get it right, if you have multiple accounts going back for many years, you'll need months to straighten out the mess GnuCash makes of it.
NOTE: In fairness to GnuCash, it's one of several that say they can import Quicken accounts but cannot do so.
Reply to
XS11E
So, it has a steep learning curve, and it sometimes works properly. That sounds very much like all Linux software I've seen. I'm a computer geek, but for the life of me I can't figure out why anyone would want to use Linux for home applications.
-- Jim
Reply to
JimH
> > }
> } > My computer is in the process of dieing and I'm giving some thought to > } > moving to Linux instead of Win7.. > } > ...One huge problem in the past has been Quicken -- I assume Intuit > } > doesn't make a Linux version yet. ?? tnx /b\ > } > } Correct. > } > } You can use GnuCash for your financial accounts. It is a sort of > QuickBooks > } and Quicken combined. GnuCash has a steep learning curve, nowhere near > as > } handy as Quicken. You have to study the tutorial. But it is usable. > > Does GnuCash do the "connect" stuff? Being able easily and smoothly > download my transactions is *very* important to me. > > /B\ > -- > Bernie Cosell Fantasy Farm Fibers > snipped-for-privacy@fantasyfarm.com Pearisburg, VA > --> Too many people, too few sheep
Reply to
Keith Snyder
I had no trouble importing from my old Quicken 99 accounts, but I had only one checking account.
There is a fundamental difference between Quicken and GnuCash due to philosophy. Quicken makes personal accounting easy for the non-CPA user, while GnuCash follows accounting principles to fanaticism. Basically, in GnuCash a transaction means movement of money or things from one account to another, while in Quicken, transactions are categorized. The relationship between an account and a category is often close enough, but sometimes isn't.
I make no claim that GnuCash is user friendly. You have to learn it, and I still bobble sometimes with GnuCash splits. A friend of mine rates Quicken, at least the older versions, as A+ programs from the end user's point of view, and I don't disagree. On his scale I rate GnuCash C-.
I found that I was better off creating my own Chart of Accounts to guide setting up GnuCash. That's pretty formal. A CofA is to accounting what a flowchart is to programming, or an outline is to writing.
Still, it is usable.
Reply to
Keith Snyder
I've been running Q2007 H&B on my Linux system for about 18 months (initially under Crossover Standard, more recently under Wine 1.2).
The basic accounting / checkbook / reporting functions all work fine for me. I've never used the transaction download functions in Quicken, so I can't say whether they work.
I keep hoping for a more capable native package. I've tried many of the current alternatives, have successfully imported my QIF files into most, but none of them provides the one Quicken feature I really depend on (i.e., ability to report with columns by class).
Regards, Rob L
Reply to
Rob Lindauer
I have to wonder how much of the problem importing Quicken files is due to problems in those Quicken files. For example, I recently moved from Quicken 2008 to 2010. While I was in Quicken 2008, super validate shows no errors in my quicken files at all. yet, after the migration, the super validate in Quicken 2010 found two pages worth of super validation errors.
I have read that the super validate in Quicken 2010 does a much better job of checking everything. Maybe GnuCash is also more sensitive to the problems in Quicken files.
Reply to
bjn
None, all my files validate, none will import correctly, even the simple checking account is FUBAR.
I have no doubt that a file problem would make the file even more FUBAR so it can't hurt to check first.
Reply to
XS11E
How about using Quicken for existing transactions and "start Fresh" with GnuCash, importing only the latest/necessary transactions over?
Reply to
Notan
"Use Quicken's Super Validate utility to check the copy of your file for damage only if evidence of corruption persists after performing Validate on the file copy. Super Validate will rebuild the Quicken file regardless of whether damage is detected in the file."
Reply to
XS11E
I'm not suggesting scrapping the old... Like transferring data to a new check register, save the old and copy the most recent data to the new register.
Reply to
Notan
Yes, you are. The title of this thread is Quicken on Linux, if Quicken won't work properly on Linux (and WINE and Crossover Office say it will not) and you can't import files into GnuCash or MoneyDance you really are suggesting scrapping the old, aren't you?
Of course, you could easily keep a copy of Windows on a separate partition but then why fool with Linux?
Reply to
XS11E

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