£50 note withdrawal


get far if they didn't accept it. Say a plumber did work for me in my house, and I paid him in Scottish banknotes, then he refused to accept them and sued me for non-payment. He'd be laughed out of court. Ergo they ARE legal tender.
How about if you offered to pay a 5000 bill with 1p coins? I think in that case it is very likely that your offer would be refused and you'd be sued if you refused to pay any other way.
--
Cynic


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or, better, how about offering to pay a £5,000 bill with £1 coins. If the Royal Mint's web page about legal tender is strictly accurate, then £1 coins are legal tender for any amount, but people can *still* refuse to accept them for payment, because legal tender only applies when making payments into court.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2013 17:21, Jon Ribbens wrote:

And it would only weigh about 1cwt.
--
Moving Things in Still Pictures!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2013 13:31, Major Scott wrote:

I wish I could find the exact wording but in a case where someone refused payment in Scotland in notes because they were not Legal Tender the judge said that while he was correct and no notes are Legal Tender there, it was "what we commonly call money" and found against him. Conclusion: case law confirmed that Notes are NOT Legal Tender in Scotland, BUT the world does NOT have to grind to a halt as a result.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That all rather depends on what you mean by "found against". I wouldn't be entirely surprised if the judge awarded costs against the defendant, but the defendant will still lose the case in the sense that he will have to pay the amount owed.

That is certainly true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 14/02/2013 19:13, Jon Ribbens wrote:

It's about acceptability to all the parties involved in a transaction. But it does not bestow a legal precedent on other transactions for the same course of action to be enforced.
--
Moving Things in Still Pictures!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So basically "it's not a law but it may aswell be" - a bit like you can't actually be fined for not going to church on Sunday. And you will be jailed for shooting a Welshman with an arrow.
--
Backup not found. A)bort, R)etry or P)anic?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

years time, I could always change it for a new one and have my £50. Mind you not living near the Bank of England may be a nuisance.

Of course he can refuse to serve you. Nobody is compelled to sell any product he has on offer.
A shopkeeper is free to accept notes and coins which are not legal tender if he chooses to do so. Similarly, he is entitled to refuse to accept those which are. Legal tender has nothing to do with what you may or may not use to pay a store when you go shopping.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
te:

e:

in 10 years time, I could always change it for a new one and have my 50. Mind you not living near the Bank of England may be a nuisance.

e
st

r-guidelines

my Scottish fivers? How much trouble can he get into? Can he refuse to serve me?

What about if I were to fill up with petrol, then produce the only money I had on me - a Scottish note? Refusing service would be a little silly, unless he wants to syphon it back out. Not just petrol - maybe a garage has done work on my car. Not as simple purchase which can be handed back.
-- http://petersparrots.com http://petersphotos.com
Why is a person who plays the piano called a pianist but a person who drives a racing car not called a racist?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The situation would be no different in principle to one in which the only money you had on you was Japanese Yen or Zimbabwe dollars.
You chose a bad example, because garages will typically take your car as surety. A better example would have been paying the bill at a restaurant after you have eaten an expensive meal.
--
Cynic


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nobody in their right mind would expect a place to take Japanese Yen. But most people accept all pounds are the same.
Has anyone ever been in a restaurant or petrol garage and not been allowed to pay in Scottish notes? I say again, they are legal tender, just like English ones. They must be taken.
--
http://petersparrots.com
http://petersphotos.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You can say it again, until the cows (or horses) come home. It won't make you right.
Scottish notes are not legal tender.
Not even in Scotland.
__
PR.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1) Why do they work as payment everywhere then? 2) Why on earth aren't they? If there is no legal tender in a country, that's just preposterous!
--
http://petersparrots.com
http://petersphotos.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They don't. Try using one in Egypt. Or Spain. Or France. (etc, etc). And do try and understand what several posters have told you. Just because some people accept them, does not make them legal tender.

There IS a legal tender in the UK. For most of us, it takes the form of coin (up to certain maxima) and Bank of England notes. In Scotland, it is coin. Full stop. That is NOT to say that notes - English, Scottish, or even Northern Ireland - are not COMMONLY ACCEPTED - because, indeed, they are! - but they are most certainly NOT LEGAL TENDER.
BTW - I am not talking (as you so crudely put it ) "shite".
Such language is unbecoming of an officer, which is why we doubt your credentials......
--
PR
> --
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Everywhere IN THE UK you pedant.
The law IS pedantic. This is a legal newsgroup.

Sounds pretty legal to me. It certainly isn't ILlegal. Where did I say it was illegal to accept such promissory notes? All that was pointed out, is that they are NOT legal tender.
10p pieces are legal (I don't think even YOU are able to argue with that!)
Try paying your Council Tax bill all in 10p pieces.
Or your TV licence (you do have one?????)
Won't be accepted.
Not legal tender. (You will doubtlessly argue with that, and you would be mistaken. That is something you only do once a week, getting mistaken.... starts on a Sunday morning and finishes on a Saturday night).
They will tell you to fuck off, wanker, and come back with either a platic card or banknotes.
(they won't actually - they will say "Sorry Sir, but I am afraid we cannot accept that much in payment for your Council Tax/TV Licence/ whatever. Perhaps you could come back later with something more suitable? May we suggest either a debit/credit card or, maybe, 10 or 20 notes? Thank you, Sir. Goodbye". But they will still be thinking to themselves "Fuck off, wanker, etc....")

You don't need to carry loads of 1 coins around with you. Even YOU have managed so far without doing so, haven't you?

I take it you are a "Major" in the Infantry. They are renowned for being as thick as two Bailey chesses tied together with string.
--

PR



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 13 Feb 2013 13:51:58 -0000, "Portsmouth Rider"
In what way?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well, there are certainly a number of tender egos.......
:o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 13/02/2013 12:36, Major Scott wrote:

They don't work everywhere.
When there was a spate of fake Scottish notes in this area shopkeepers and pubs just refused to take them, fake or otherwise. Anyone who got gobby about it was refused service and asked to leave the premises.
--
Moving Things in Still Pictures!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ote:

he

car

like

make

y,

That's fair enough if there are fakes.
Hmmmm there is a spate of forged ENGLISH 50s - can a shop refuse those on the same grounds?
-- http://petersparrots.com http://petersphotos.com
"You, you, and you ... panic. The rest of you, come with me." - U.S. Marine Corp Gunnery Sgt.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, for that one or for any other grounds or for no grounds at all. Legal tender does not mean that it must be accepted as a payment. The only current practical meaning that I know for "Legal Tender" is that when it is used to make a payment into a court it creates a defence against a suit for debt.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BeanSmart.com is a site by and for consumers of financial services and advice. We are not affiliated with any of the banks, financial services or software manufacturers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.

Tax and financial advice you come across on this site is freely given by your peers and professionals on their own time and out of the kindness of their hearts. We can guarantee neither accuracy of such advice nor its applicability for your situation. Simply put, you are fully responsible for the results of using information from this site in real life situations.