can you insist on your salary being paid to you in cash?




There is no law that says you must have a bank account, therefore if no company will employ you because they will not pay you cash, then you can't work. (surely this against your human rights)
I am expecting to become bankrupt soon.........that should be interesting.!
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True.. I was only suggesting reasons why the OP may be having problems opening a bank account (i.e. not on the electoral roll)

interesting.!
Sorry to hear that - but as you can see from the table in the FSA document "even" bankrupts should be able to open a "basic" bank account as they are specifically designed for people who have problems opening "regular" accounts.
Have you come accoss the "Dealing with Debt" board on the Motley Fool (http://boards.fool.co.uk/messages.asp?mid 53169) - you will find people who have gone through what you are currently experiencing.
Regards Sunil
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jerome) wrote:

No. The Truck Acts were repealed by the Thatcher Government.
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On 31 Oct 2003 09:05:17 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jerome) wrote:

For a laugh, you might want to suggest the prospective bank manager pays a visit to your home !
Otherwise, as Jason mentioned I'd imagine your tenancy agreement and documentation would suffice.
Daytona
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jerome) wrote in message

The answer to the question you ask is no - your employer can insist that you are paid by cheque or by bank transfer. If the bank you have approached is demanding utility bills they are acting unreasonably. You should ask to speak to a manager - all banks have procedures for people who simply have no way of producing the "identity" documents they nornally require. Alternatively go to another bank.
jb
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You may find that your employer can get you an account at their bank branch. Back in the days when bank charges were normal, my employer offered charge-free accounts to its employees, with the advantage that pay went into the account a few days earlier.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jerome) wrote:

Get your birth certificate and open a Basic Bank Account. Even if you had a right to your wages in cash, you'd get sacked.
BTW, you only have a right to your creditors meeting their fiscal obligations to you, with legal tender. The precise definition of legal tender is set by the Chancellor, by Statutory Instrument, each year. It invariably includes, for some sums, cheques.
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Tom Moore wrote:

I'd be interested in reading one of these SIs. Do you have a name or number for one? A search of the HMSO site came up empty.
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No I couldn't fin any either.
You may find Gordon Brown doesn't even remember he's doing it. Kenneth Clarke had to be reminded by the Speaker to propose this legislation, which is not opposed, and being a money bill, not subject to The Lords. Hence it is law within a couple of hours, usually at 6.00pm.
I cannot find any precise definition of legal tender anywhere, however, if you search Parliament's web site, HMSO sub section, for Legal Tender, you will see a lot of legislation that requires Legal Tender (Legal Aid, for example). You don't think these debts are all met with cash do you?
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Tom Moore wrote:

I don't think they're met with cash, no, but I think that's because the payees don't insist on Legal Tender. It's a matter of practicality rather than law. In large enough amounts, cash is as impracticable to handle for a taker of it as it is for a giver of it.
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Indeed, but that is the point: if one agrees to sell a house, and house prices double, are you saying one can renege on that contract by insisting on payment in Legal Tender. The largest denomination of notes issue by the Bank of England is 50.
As to proving my case, I can't. The references you will find, do make clear that particular notes and coins cease to be legal tender as the sum in question changes. You cannot insist of paying a bill over 100 with 1p coins: they're not Legal Tender for that. Chancellor Norman Lamont is even on Hansard as saying Legal Tender is an extremly complex subject, but that tends to repeat the question.
Once 50 notes are impracticable, perhaps for sums over 50 000, is there no Legal Tender? I have a feeling SIs are not on the Parliament web site (yet).
Sorry.
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Tom Moore wrote:

The yanks have an answer to that. Pity the BoE don't do the obvious.

Well, there you go. You must be mistaken, then. If there is an SI, it should be easy to find, but it ain't.

They're all on the HMSO site, aren't they? I couldn't find a link to HMSO from parliament, by the way.
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Doesn't follow. If all legislation was on web sites, wouldn't be much point selling copies, would there? Note the Parliament web site offers bills, not acts, and not dollar bills either.
You still have not said how one buys a house with Legal Tender. Get a truck and shovel?
Also, if it's all so clear, how come Ken Clarke nearly screwed it up when he was Chancellor?
Ask Lord Lamont: I bet he knows. When someone took over as Chancellor, not sure who, his predecessor took elevent red boxes for his weekend reading. The new Chancellor said, "just give me two of those boxes, doesn't matter which."

Do a search from the home Parliament page. You'll be searching through HMSO.
Who is First Lord of the Treasury?
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On 3 Nov 2003 05:22:51 GMT, Tom Moore

The HMSO website has copies of all Acts (and SI) passed since 1988

Legal tender shouldn't be refused by a debtor in settlement of a debt. Houses are not usually bought that way - completion and payment invariably happen at the same time, so there no time for a debt to accrue between the buyer and the seller. The existence of a contract of sale doesn't automatically result in a debt
Tha Bank of England has no trouble knowing what is and isn't Legal Tender
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/legaltender.htm
Brian
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"Tom Moore" wrote

truck

What vendor would *insist* on Legal Tender for their house?
If you were interested in buying a house, and the vendor insisted on payment by a truck-load of Legal Tender, wouldn't you get rather suspicious?
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As the Euro was about to be introduced in Spain, the property market - particularly in Majorca - and the luxury car market, went through the roof as people sought to find an outlet for the stashes of hard currency pesetas they'd been hording for years, often the result of black market employment, and which were about to become useless (I think banks were only premitting exchange of up to £10,000 worth. It was pretty common for people to buy houses, villas and Mercedes cars using suitcases full of notes, and cash transactions typically attracted a substantial premium, which is what drove the prices up
Brian
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Tom Moore wrote:

Of course there would. It's very much more expensive to download and print out a copy of something than buying it would be. But just to quickly browse something, it's not worth buying the whole tome for.

a) Nobody in their right mind would insist on it. b) Even limited by the £50 maximum note, even a £200k house would require only 4 thousand notes. They would comfortably fit in a briefcase. No need of truck or shovel.

Nice gossip, but hardly germane.

What's the point? I can get there from the HMSO home page.

Who cares?
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Not true. I have already explained why and how someone would.

The First Lord of the Treasury?
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"Tom Moore" wrote

I can't find where you explained it. Care to re-cap?
Anyway, anyone *insisting* on Legal Tender for a large transaction like that should expect to be looked on with suspicion!
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Insist on Legal Tender bank notes, in order to back out of a house sale, perhaps following sharp price rises.

I always insist on used non consecutive bank notes, served in a brief case, by men smoking cigars and wearing bowler hats. No one regards me with suspicion.
If anyone sees Jack the Pratt McVitie, who left me one thousand single dollar bills, printed on the reverse, "In God we Trust" and underneath "(all others pay cash)" let me know.
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