Car insurance and missing no claims

My son who is thirty years old has not had much use for a car of his own so has often used mine when needed and so has been included on my insurance. He now needs a car of his own, and when looking at the insurance costs finds he is quoted about 800 a year even for an old 2002 Honda Civic which is only worth 1300 or so. And that's looking at the cheapest quotes on the price comparison sites out of moneysavingexpertcom.
He was told by one company he rang, that his premium was high since he had no 'no-claims' bonus. That's despite driving accident free since he was seventeen, but its because he had no car insurance in his own name.
Is there any way that it could be arranged to try and bring his premium down? I dont mind including him on my insurance if that would help, or is there any other way that we could usefully try? Thanks.
Reply to
j stone watson
I have the same problem with an offspring of mine. There is nothing you can do. I've tried everywhere and everything.
Time for your lad to start earning some NCB in his own name.
You can of course buy a business policy which allows any driver but how much this is I don't know and he still wouldn't get any NCB.
Reply to
Joe 60
wrote:
Elephant & Direct Line are often cheaper than some of the price comparison sites, but you're not going to get much below £800 if you've got no NCB without deliberately buying an insurance Group 1 car.
Reply to
Duncan Wood
For me, with 20 year no claims, Direct Line have always been one of the most expensive quotes (by 30%+) when I've been shopping around for a policy.
Reply to
alan
No claims discount tends to go with the vehicle rather than the driver so, if you've never owned a vehicle, it's hard to get a discount. If you buy a second car and register it in your name rather than your son's, you'll still be starting from scratch as far as that car is concerned.
In the past, people who have had exclusive use of a company car have sometimes been able to negotiate a NCD when buying a car for themselves, but even that doesn't really apply to your son. It may be an idea to visit one or two insurance brokers rather than looking at the on-line comparison sites. They just *might* be able to point you at a company which will offer a discount based on your record while driving someone else's car, but I wouldn't bank on it.
Reply to
Roger Mills
The value of the car is irrelevant. If your son is a bold courier in the capital that is the type of premium he can expect; if he is a bookman in Cheltenham he should be able to improve that, and a newer car may be cheaper.
Does your insurer offer 'named driver NCB'? Lots do. A few used to offer introductory discount if you had several years experience with no accidents, but they might not show up on comparison sites. If you've just been trying TPFT see what the premiums are for FC with a very large excess. Make sure you are including yourself and your spouse as named drivers on his car. See if you can get a cashback offer.
Reply to
Nick Finnigan
Sorry, that should have been "If you've got no no claims". Generally I find Direct Line a bit useless on many levels.
Reply to
Duncan Wood
Two suggestions.
Find an insurance broker. They may be able to magic a 'NCB' based on his experience. Some insurance companies can be surprisingly flexible.
Another possibly surprising possibility is to put yourself as named driver on his policy. Insurance companies may 'dilute' the premium using a form of 'averaging' for the named drivers.
Flop
Reply to
Flop
You evidence being . . . ?
If you have a multi-car policy with the likes of Admiral, each car has its own NCB.
Reply to
Roger Mills
Roger Mills spake thus:
NCB normally follows the policyholder.
Sorry but that is wrong. If you sold your car to someone else, the new owner won't inherit your NCB with the car.
Reply to
Scion
My other 1/2s insurance went down by £60 when she added me, despite it being more expensive to insure the car in my name.
Reply to
Duncan Wood
Duncan Wood spake thus:
My insurance went down (can't remember how much by though) when I added my GF, who had had 2 at-fault claims (including 3rd party personal injury) in the previous 3 years whereas I have had no at-fault claims at all.
Reply to
Scion
[...]
So, despite being outlawed, sexual discrimination is still practised in the motor insurance world? Oh, assuming you are male, of course. Apologies if otherwise!
Chris
Reply to
Chris Whelan
He might end up with his claim being rejected if the insurers find out he's the car's principal driver.
He could take the Advanced Driving Test, or try an insurer who will insert a black box which checks when/where he is driving and at what sort of speed.
Presumably you've trimmed the fat off his estimated annual mileage.
When the EU non-discrimination law comes into force, the premium might come down by a miniscule amount, but it's more likely premiums for women will soar.
Adrian
Reply to
anonymous

BeanSmart website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.