Payment taken after Credit Card Cancelled

"Yellow" wrote


How does the answer to that, affect anything?
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It really isn't that simple. I had a few direct debits going out from an account every month for 14 years. Very recently I wanted to close that account and change the direct debit to a new account.
Despite me having the original paperwork (IIRC AA Accident Cash Plan) and the policy number it took me literally half a day of research to find out who was actually collecting the money (and responsible for the insurance). Another one, fortunately, the 0800 number still worked (although a completely different company now) so that one was fairly simple.
And at least these were going out every month so they were easy to spot and also to tell if and when the changes had actually been made.
When you've got several changes of address on your end and several changes of company on the other end and a tiny payment that only goes out once per year it's almost impossible to spot them.
I could understand the logic if my ex bank/cc charged me to write to me to tell me they had refused a payment because my account had been closed but I cannot see the logic of the bank/cc being able to continue to honour payments on my behalf once I've ended my relationship with them.
Tim.
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They claim the honour payments to save customers 'embarrassment'.

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Direct debits come under different rules. Check out the 'Direct Debit Guarantee'. Any errors need to be corrected immediately by your bank...

Couldn't you simply ask your bank for details of the originator of the direct debit on your a/c with them?

If you don't watch over your own finances properly, then you've only got yourself to blame!

If you end the relationship properly (including cancelling all outstanding authorities), then there should be no problem.
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Have you ever tried asking them that? I did once, they hadn't a clue who/what was doing the Direct Debit.
--
Chris Green

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In that case, it must be "in error", eh? [ & therefore need reversing ... <g> !]
BTW - what is the "originator's number" for?
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Why must it be an error? I had one that just had a four letter identifier (NUIL to be specific). It was a perfectly correct direct debit but it took me quite a while to find the corresponding files etc. that went with it. I have 20 or so direct debits set up on my current account, of these most are fairly easy to work out what they are but a few have cryptic payees like the "NUIL" above. Since I have quite a few possible things that this NUIL migt refer to it's non trivial matching them up.
As it happens I have now myself up an index on my computer where I have noted down what all the direct debits are for, including these cryptic ones, so I don't have to go searching again.
Whatever, the bank was worse than useless in telling me what NUIL was for.

You mean the "reference" against the DD - it only has a meaning to the originator surely so is absolutely useless unless you know who the originator is.
--
Chris Green

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Didn't you notice my cheeky grin? ;-)
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At 14:56:06 on 15/12/2007, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk delighted uk.finance by announcing:

No. He presumably means the "originator's number".

Which is where the originator's number comes in.
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Ken <Reply to NG only> wrote:

Probably correctly. Gotta read the small print.
I had a similar problem years ago with fraudulent payments being taken from a card. I cancelled the card and took a new one. The fraud continued and payments passed to the new card.
In sorting it all out, which took months, the CC advisor told me that in such circumstances he would burn the card and report it stolen. The system for dealing with sloen cards and requested payments are apparently much more robust.
Of course it would mean making the fraudulent claim that the card had been stolen, but if the card has been burned...
FoFP
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ever major bank would be insolvent if they marked their assets to market."
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"M Holmes" wrote

Don't they deal with *lost* cards in the same way as *stolen* ones?
You could, ahem, "lose" the burned card afterwards, and then report that you lost it - without making any fraudulent claim...
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Tim wrote:

If a card has been lost or stolen *after* a continuing authority had been given to a merchant, the theft or loss of the card would not affect the validity of the original authority, would it, even if the merchant (or their bent staff) subsequently made fraudulent payment requests perportedly under said original authority.
There'd be a credibility problem with one's evidence if one were to claim to have lost one's card prior to a date after which legitimate transactions were made with it, unless one were to attempt to disown all those transactions too. Might as well hang for a sheep as a lamb.
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Ken wrote:

There seem to be two problems here:
        1)    Remembering which CC payments are repeatable and which will be invoiced annually (or whenever).
        2)    Knowing that a continuous authority (CCA) *has* been set up. It has been known for annual contracts (insurance etc) to be paid by CC and the insurer converting the one-off payment to CCA.
It can be buried in the T&Cs (which you may not find if you order on-line) or there may be no mention of it at all. There does not seem to be a requirement that the cardholder actively gives permission. A form of inertia selling.
Inform the CC company and the insurer and if a charge appears, immediately ask for a chargeback and tell the insurer that you are doing so.
Flop
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On 12 Dec, 08:29, "Ken" <Reply to NG only> wrote:

Similar thing happened to me with an _expired_ card.
Remember that when cancelling the "Account" and "Card" have different meanings.
Continuous Authority payments are a menace...

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At 08:29:38 on 12/12/2007, Ken delighted uk.finance by announcing:

He has been correctly advised. It is up to him to cancel any recurring payments.
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