The Inflation will keep growing?

I was looking at the new statistics.gov.uk website, and the month by month inflation index figures are much harder to find now. This is what I found from:
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The figures for the last year are:
2010AUG 224.5 2010SEP 225.3 2010Q4 227 2010OCT 225.8 2010NOV 226.8 2010DEC 228.4 2011Q1 230.9 2011JAN 229 2011FEB 231.3 2011MAR 232.5 2011Q2 234.9 2011APR 234.4 2011MAY 235.2 2011JUN 235.2 2011JUL 234.7 2011AUG 236.1
Jan 1987 0
So for the last six months Aug figure - Feb figure = 236.1 - 231.3 4.8 4.8/231.1 = 0.0208. Or about 4.2 % annually.
I can't see how prices will start to reduce any time soon to meet the 2% CPI target. Any explations welcome.
I thought that normally prices fell during the spring and summer because of seasonal food, and lower fuel oil prices. Gas and electric is going up a lot next month, and train travel is going up in the new year by 8%. On the plus side the new Red Hot Chili Peppers album is about half the ticket price and about 1/4 the real price I would have paid 20 years ago.
You can also look at the table 3.5 for a 1974 basis = 100
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which gives figures for the 19th century, when prices seemed to be stable or falling, the UK economy was 2nd or 3rd in the world, people could leave school at 12, and there was the poorhouse as the last stop for welfare.
Reply to
Dave
wrote:
1.the cpi and rpi are dishonest figures...the real inflation is higher 2)it is important to distinguish rising prices from inflation... eg oil supplies are in increasing shortfall...that will raise their real prices..... 3)the uk government is now controlling the money supply after the socialist 'new' labour party profligacy... that will in due course bring down inflation** see blue line..
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**ps, inflation takes time to feed through....at least 18 months in present conditions...
Reply to
abelard
In message , Dave writes
Yes, they are much harder to find: it is not clear if it is deliberate concealment or just that they are trying to make the site more accessible for first time users and have forgotten about regular users.. It took me several minutes instead of being able to go straight to them. Their home page does 'boast' about the new website, and has an address for comments.
Sheila
>
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?cdid=CH>AW&dataset=mm23&table-id=2.1 > >The figures for the last year are: > >2010AUG 224.5 >2010SEP 225.3 >2010Q4 227 >2010OCT 225.8 >2010NOV 226.8 >2010DEC 228.4 >2011Q1 230.9 >2011JAN 229 >2011FEB 231.3 >2011MAR 232.5 >2011Q2 234.9 >2011APR 234.4 >2011MAY 235.2 >2011JUN 235.2 >2011JUL 234.7 >2011AUG 236.1 > >Jan 1987 0 > >So for the last six months Aug figure - Feb figure = 236.1 - 231.3 >4.8 >4.8/231.1 = 0.0208. Or about 4.2 % annually. > >I can't see how prices will start to reduce any time soon to meet the >2% CPI target. Any explations welcome. > >I thought that normally prices fell during the spring and summer >because of seasonal food, and lower fuel oil prices. Gas and electric >is going up a lot next month, and train travel is going up in the new >year by 8%. On the plus side the new Red Hot Chili Peppers album is >about half the ticket price and about 1/4 the real price I would have >paid 20 years ago. > >You can also look at the table 3.5 for a 1974 basis = 100 > >
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> >which gives figures for the 19th century, when prices seemed to be >stable or falling, the UK economy was 2nd or 3rd in the world, people >could leave school at 12, and there was the poorhouse as the last stop >for welfare.
Reply to
Sheila Page
wrote:
i have been using and following government fiscal numbers for decades.
they are regularly changed and redefined... some are extremely difficult to locate
there can be no reason for that, other than deliberate fraud
>Sheila > > >>
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?cdid=CH>>AW&dataset=mm23&table-id=2.1 >> >>The figures for the last year are: >> >>2010AUG 224.5 >>2010SEP 225.3 >>2010Q4 227 >>2010OCT 225.8 >>2010NOV 226.8 >>2010DEC 228.4 >>2011Q1 230.9 >>2011JAN 229 >>2011FEB 231.3 >>2011MAR 232.5 >>2011Q2 234.9 >>2011APR 234.4 >>2011MAY 235.2 >>2011JUN 235.2 >>2011JUL 234.7 >>2011AUG 236.1 >> >>Jan 1987 0 >> >>So for the last six months Aug figure - Feb figure = 236.1 - 231.3 >>4.8 >>4.8/231.1 = 0.0208. Or about 4.2 % annually. >> >>I can't see how prices will start to reduce any time soon to meet the >>2% CPI target. Any explations welcome. >> >>I thought that normally prices fell during the spring and summer >>because of seasonal food, and lower fuel oil prices. Gas and electric >>is going up a lot next month, and train travel is going up in the new >>year by 8%. On the plus side the new Red Hot Chili Peppers album is >>about half the ticket price and about 1/4 the real price I would have >>paid 20 years ago. >> >>You can also look at the table 3.5 for a 1974 basis = 100 >> >>
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>> >>which gives figures for the 19th century, when prices seemed to be >>stable or falling, the UK economy was 2nd or 3rd in the world, people >>could leave school at 12, and there was the poorhouse as the last stop >>for welfare.
Reply to
abelard
Dave wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@h9g2000yqi.googlegroups.com:
Reagan and Thatcher defeated inflation after 8 years of it (at 10+% per year) in the post-Vietnam years. 2 Arab embargoes jacked it up hugely in the 1970's as the lobsided "friendship" between the U.S. and Israel began to tell...Meanwhile, give socialists any time in office (Obama) and back comes inflation. They are a plague.
Reply to
Rich
wrote:
Started in the 1980s when your Bitch Goddess wanted to hide the real unemployment figures. By 1986 the government statisticians were threatening strike action over the debasement of their prfession
Reply to
AlanG
wrote:
Very true.
I'm not sure exactly what you mean there. Are you referring to the prices than can be affected by policy decisions and those that can't?
>3)the uk government is now controlling the money supply > after the socialist 'new' labour party profligacy... > that will in due course bring down inflation** >see blue line.. >
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Bwhahahaha! >**ps, inflation takes time to feed through....at least > 18 months in present conditions...
Reply to
Mark
You can be swamped by data by looking at the spreadsheets at:
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me-series-data.html That is another way of burying the truth.
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Reply to
Dave

At least moderate inflation over a very long period and/or large-scale sharp devaluation is the *only* way the UK government will ever have any chance of 'paying off' the debt that is *still* increasing by ~150 billion a year. So, large haircuts for the lenders, but keep it as quiet as possible for as long as possible.
Dave knows that just as well as Gordon did.
Of course, it does also require a lot of *real* growth in the economy, so that large quantities of the less-valuable money will be available to do the paying. Growth in the public sector *consumes* tax revenue, it doesn't generate it, and I cannot see why Gordon ever thought otherwise.
Devaluation of the currency is necessary but not sufficient. A large, sustained excess of tax revenue over government spending (as if!) is also necessary. Otherwise a substantial portion of tax revenue will disappear in interest payments forever.
Reply to
Joe
just so
he's thick...the one thing no-one seems to consider, understand or realise he really is seriously thick
how will you define growth, real or otherwise?
that depends! the 'interest' is paid in continually devaluing coin...
and inflation produces tax revenue on a homeric scale
regards
Reply to
abelard
abelard writes:
Which would not help as the lenders would just keep increasing the interest rates, so the repayments would keep up with (or even overtake) the rate of inflation.
Reply to
Graham Murray
Spending taxpayer's money *can* generate growth. A subsidy to mining in the 80s to keep the price of deep mined coal on a par with that of state subsidised imported coal would have kept loads of people in work in the private sector. With a stable core business they could compete for other work. Even some of the present day tories are admitting their bitch goddess was an economic illiterate on that score.
The classic example is the USA subsidy to military suppliers. Very rarely does a non US company get a toehold in the bread and butter supply chain.
Reply to
AlanG
wrote:
Not much good when the paper it is printed on finally becomes more valuable than the currency itself. That's when it is cheaper to burn your salary to keep warm rather than pay a fuel bill
Reply to
AlanG

The problem is that such a subsidy is in breach of EU rules so the colour of the UK government is irrelevant
tim
Reply to
tim....
wrote:
at present no....market pressure makes interest rates very low.... the far east is saving far more than they spend... presently the banks won't lend on anything but safe bets... in the meanwhile the government is forcing banks to hold more capital(that also is squeezing lending)
Reply to
abelard
wrote:

just add zeros to the face number
meanwhile we are not even close to your assertion... even in zimbabwe they weren't burning the paper...even in hungary and germany it was myth making...
in britain, first one small coin disappears...then another... in a decade or three we get 'new' pounds
regards
Reply to
abelard

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