Using the £15k cash ISA allowance?

I opened a cash ISA of about £5k with Virgin Money early in this tax year (2014-2015). But I had no reminder from them about the opportunity to raise that to £15k in July, and consequently forgot all
about it until now.
Virgin Money advise me that there was only a 30-day window for that, throughout the UK, not just their own rule, so I can no longer do so. Is that true? I thought you could invest your allowance at any time up to the end of the tax year?
--
Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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On 19/01/2015 13:18, snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

Virgin are right - and wrong.
The 30day rule is specific to many providers - especially if the money went into bonds at a fixed rate..
However, you can still invest the rest of the allowance in a stocks & shares Isa.
Very confusing but these may help:
http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/news/banking/2014/07/got-a-new-fixed-rate-isa-top-it-up-now-to-15000-nisa-allowance
http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/saving/article-2622287/Savers-left-bamboozled-differing-Nisa-deadlines.html
    even though they are not consistent.
--

Flop

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Thanks, understood. (I'm averse to further equities at present, so my focus is exclusively on cash.)
One other assumption I was making has also just been dashed this morning. I thought that I could instead now take out a NEW ISA using the remaining £9060 of my cash ISA allowance for 2014-2015. But my local Nationwide branch tell me that you can only take out a cash ISA with a SINGLE provider in any one tax year.
--
Terry, East Grinstead, UK

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On 20/01/2015 10:43, snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

And Nationwide are paying peanuts. :-(
--
Gordon H

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On 31/01/2015 11:03, Gordon H wrote:

That is not really fair.
I have been looking to replace a NW cash ISA and was disappointed by the 1.8% for 2year fixed.
However, on comparing the competition, it comes out quite well.
http://moneycompare.which.co.uk/savings-and-isas/fixed-rate-isas?fixed_period_dayss0&investment_amount=&page=2&sort=initial_aer-desc&utf8=%E2%9C%93
Higher than most mainstream competitors.
I think we were both looking at absolute figures rather than comparative returns against RPI [or whatever].
There is little difference between a rate of 10% when the RPI is 8% and 2% when RPI is 0%.
What makes the current situation worse is having to lose a 5% ISA and replace it with a 2% one. That hurts.
--

Flop

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On 31/01/2015 17:18, Flop wrote:

I (pessimistically) wasn't looking at fixed ISAs at age 81. :-)
--
Gordon H

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If my dad's experience is anything to go buy, that wont stop an FA telling you a fixed 10 year investment is "best".
(Bastard didn't even ask if dad had any health issues that might make his life expectancy any less than it might be for an 80 yo)
tim
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