Q Performance Report

I had asked a month or two ago about getting better information:
Someone suggested that I use the "performance report" build within Quicken. I've been trying but quicken reports on all investments - even the ones I have sold and am not interested in. I also have the investment marked (investments>Securities List make as hidden nut they are still being reported on. But on top of everything else, Q doesn't give a correct percentage return - they vary from the real return and I can't find out why. I'm just not getting what I want - a report that shows me the return on investment on a cumulative yearly percentage. Does anyone know how to get to my end point from what Q provides? R. Wink
Reply to
rwwink
t sell, I don't
Suggestion: go to Portfolio, select Investing, Select your account, select your security of interest,under reports select Investment Performance with custom dates and subtotal by year. Your report will show you the percentage gain/loss for that security for each year taking into account the value at the start of the year, the value at the end of the year and the dividends received that year. Try it and see if that works for you.
David P.
Reply to
David P.
Within Quicken, you can't. Your definition of 'Return' is not comparable t o their definition (See the Quicken glossary in Help). Similarly what you are defining for Return on Investment is different than their definition, a nd I suspect what you are using as Amount Invested is different.
You can create a report that documents the dividends you received over the years. Similarly, you could create a report for what you paid for the shar es over the years. Because of potential sales, this second task will be mo re difficult. Relying on cost basis as the investment amount would be much easier. Export those reports to Excel and do your own computations.
I would continue to hold forth that your methodology based on historical di vidend patterns is not very suitable for the assessment you seem to be tryi ng to make - what pays good dividends now.
Reply to
Tod
This exercise is to determine which, if any, of my investment have returned 5% or more since I bought them. I'm a buy and hold type of guy and I don't generally sell unless something goes wrong. If they haven't returned 5%, it a pretty sure sign they're not going to in the future irregardless if it's a PG, IBM, AMD or MON. If I've owned a stock for say 5 years and it's paid around 4% dividends, It's not going to pay 8% over the next 5 years; fact is that it's will be lucky to continue to pay at the current rate. The past 5 years has been pretty good for the market. I don't think the next 5 years are going to be anywhere as good so I want to thin the herd and I'm using dividend return as an indicator to do it. I'm retired and want the most income I can get, now and in the future. The past is not predictive of the future but it does provide information about the general direction and gross returns you should expect from a stock. I ran through MY predictive routine when I bought these stocks (for the most part) and have done fairly well on return. R. Wink

Reply to
rwwink

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