Quicken being divested

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On Thu, 20 Aug 2015 17:11:48 -0600, Arthur Conan Doyle

But if it spins off cash with little cost/ effort in updating it, it's still worth keeping alive
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snipped-for-privacy@nada.com wrote:

That's the problem - it isn't spinning off cash. Consumer desktop software is a one time purchase. A mature product like Quicken doesn't compel consumers to buy new versions on a recurring basis. Intuit tried to address that by forcing upgrades every three years to keep OSU alive with limited success. They also tried to generate revenue by charging banks a lot of money to enable OSU, but we're seeing reports that some banks are dropping that now.
Combine that with a flat at best and probably declining market for PCs and they couldn't find enough new buyers to support the business.
On the cost side, Intuit is already running a pretty lean operation. The Quicken UI hasn't seen any investment in years and they shifted support to a peer to peer model years ago.
Is there enough revenue to support keeping a small independent team working on tax law changes and any tweaks required by changes to Windows? Maybe. I don't think we're going to see any huge updates to the software with a spinoff.
Another possibility is that someone with a hot new financial product sees the Quicken customer base as a shortcut to launching their new web based product and buys the company for access to the names. Have no idea what that could be. My guess is that Intuit would see that as a threat to Mint and prevent it as a condition of sale.
Bottom line: OSU may go away, but the existing core product will be functional as is for the forseeable future. Just nothing new to look forward to.
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2015 at 09:57 -0000, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

This is one place where Intuit's policies may have backfired on them. Being greedy on Direct Connect (with a fixed cost to Intuit) has cost them significant ongoing costs for Express Web Connect. Development of Direct Connect technology in Quicken has already been paid for with just minor ongoing maintenance costs. Express Web Connect on the other hand has significant ongoing operational and development costs. The primary revenue for Express Web Connect comes from Quicken sales and forced upgrades.
There might be enough data mining revenue in Express Web Connect to offset it's ongoing costs, but they probably need more information to make it fully useful (think Free Credit Scores and Intuit IDs to tie things together).
Stuart Barkley
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going. I have my doubts.
A question. Suppose that I was obliged to start using QuickBooks as a replacement to Quicken. What features would I lose? Portfolio management?
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David Arnstein wrote:

Discussion of Quicken alternatives here:
http://www.pcmech.com/article/5-quicken-alternatives-intuit-isnt-the-only-company-that-does-personal-finance-software/
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} Discussion of Quicken alternatives here: } } http://www.pcmech.com/article/5-quicken-alternatives-intuit-isnt-the-only-company-that-does-personal-finance-software/
Except for gnucash the comparisons don't say much about the various program's ability to connect to banks to download transactions and provide bill pay.
/b\
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On Thu, 10 Sep 2015 15:28:17 -0400, Bernie Cosell

Anybody here have any experience with any if these alternatives? If so, I'd appreciate hearing from you and your telling us how it compares with Quicken, especially regarding Bernie's comment about downloading transactions and providing bill pay.
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If you have multiple accounts over many years, as I do, none of the alternatives will do a proper import and if you do an import the files will be so FUBAR that the only alternative is to delete them and manually enter everything. With thousands of entries that's not an option.
Summary, sorry to say it but for me there is no Quicken alternative yet but I'm hopeful...
My solution will probably be pick one and create ONE account for checking, and then use the broker's web pages to track all other accounts.
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wrote:

Thanks. Your answer is disappointing, but if that's the way it is...
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No reason not to give some of the free ones a trial, if your Quicken files are such that the import works or partially works you may be OK.
It's worth the time IMHO and may your luck be better than mine!
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wrote:

Thanks. I may do as you suggest, but not yet. I'll wait and see what happens with Quicken. If there was never another version of Quicken but the current one continued to download transactions and provide bill pay, I'd be a happy camper.
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On Friday, September 11, 2015 at 3:37:49 PM UTC-4, Ken Blake, MVP wrote:

[Qkn 15 Dlx, Vista Ultimate 32-bit SP2] One issue raised earlier is the problem of connecting to Intuit in order to reinstall Quicken 15 should you change platforms.
A second issue not mentioned earlier is the quandary facing Quicken Mobile users. While in many posts I was derisive of use of "The Cloud", another po ster reached a solution, which I followed, of setting up only cash accounts and when transactions downloaded to desktop, move them to appropriate real accounts, including credit card ones.
This is turning into the experience of pet lovers facing replacement after beloved pet's life cycle runs through to end. My dog never fetched the news paper, let alone data from the bank, but you get the drift.....
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That's the problem - the desktop software market is dead - hence Intuit's decision to divest. Now days it's all web based with smartphone/tablet access. Note that Intuit is keeping Mint.
From their perspective it lets them generate recurring revenue from constantly scanning your transactions and financial situation, unlike desktop software which is once a year at best.
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On 08/21/2015 10:49 AM, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

Unless it's been improved drastically since I last tried it a few years ago, Mint just isn't worth the effort. For me, it was mostly an exercise in frustration, and far inferior to Quicken, even when it wasn't nagging me that it couldn't access one of my accounts. The potential end results just weren't worth the hassle.
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On 08/21/2015 10:49 AM, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

Why not do what MS did with Office? Make it a subscription model. They must have discussed it, one would think.
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On Sat, 19 Sep 2015 18:16:33 -0400, Kobac

I tend to agree. We pay $100 per year for up to 5 copies of MS Office 365 Home Edition which includes Word, Excel, Outlook, Publisher, PowerPoint, Access, and OneNote.
When we got it, it was Office 2013. When 2016 was released, we were invited to upgrade with no special cost, just keep paying $100 / year (I presume this will go up...).
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They should sell it to Microsoft.
"Jeffrey" wrote in message
See http://www.zdnet.com/article/intuit-earnings-q2-2015/
http://investors.intuit.com/press-releases/press-release-details/2015/Intuit-Reports-Q4-and-Fiscal-2015-Results-QuickBooks-Online-Grew-57-to-1075000-Subscribers/default.aspx
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Here is another article about Quicken's dance with death: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2974462/mac-apps/intuit-puts-venerable-quicken-up-on-the-block.html#tk.rss_all
According to this article,     For the last 12 months, Quicken contributed just $51 million     to the company's total revenue of nearly $4.2 billion.
That is the heart of the matter, right there.
The article also references a FAQ from Intuit: https://qlc.intuit.com/announcements/1208584
It is mostly corporate bullshit. Some interesting bits:
* Quicken 2016 is going to happen. * Intuit will continue to "invest in the Mac offering." WTF?
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