Camelot Lottery Scam??

I have always been warned off the National Lottery due to the poor odds at winning anything. So when I heard that the EuroMillions might be a good bet I decided to purchased one 'ticket.' This was in a local Tescos. IT COST TWO POUNDS.
Now I had always thought that a Lottery ticket cost ONE pound. So I asked where on the leaflets, and playing form was there a mention of the cost of a ticket. The staff couldn't tell me. I checked the small print on the back. Nothing.
So is Camelot ripping the gullible public off by not printing the betting cost? Or is Tesco charging a fee for the processing too?
Whatever - how can Camelot and Tesco get away with not advertising the costs? Surely that's a scam at best or illegal at worst.
CJB
Reply to
CJB
There's a big clue there that they are NOT both run by Camelot, and one of them is not national...
Even the disclaimer on Euromillions website reads
"Disclaimer: Euro-millions.com is affiliated with Camelot UK Lotteries Limited for marketing purposes only"
Reply to
Mike P
See:
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eygoes.ftl
The prize pool is approximately 50% of ticket price. A further 78% goes to 'good causes'. The remaining 22% would be taxes, expenses and agents' commissions.
In the long run you are going to lose 50% of your 'investment' so get used to the idea.
See:
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As you can see - same odds as Camelot - 50%. >
Leaflet cannot explain everything. Did you travel many miles to try and buy a one pound ticket?
They get 5% - do you expect Tesco to sell tickets on a non-profit basis?
Horses or dogs might be a better bet, perhaps.
Reply to
peterwn
wrote:
Euromillions cost £1.50 when they first came in, then it went up to £2 a few years ago.
And there is no guarantee that standard lottery tickets will always be one pound.
They quite naturally don't put the price on the forms, because then they would have to change the forms if the price changes.
Neither.
There is no requirement to advertise the costs, although they are readily available.
Reply to
Alex Heney
een warned off the National Lottery due to the poor
Oops 28% to 'Good Causes'. - my apologies.
Reply to
peterwn

They are both run by Camelot - under licence, so there's no guarantee that situation will continue forever.
Adrian
Reply to
anonymous

formatting link
>
And Camelot profits, towards the Ontario Teachers' Pension Fund.
VERY long run. The payouts are strongly weighted towards the jackpot rather than paying anything resembling 'true odds', so if you haven't won your fair share of jackpots your percentage loss will almost certainly be far greater than 50%.
Actually there is a scam element. Participants in the Eurozone pay 2 Euros per ticket. Because of the recent fall in the Euro, the equivalent sterling cost really should be reduced back down to £1.50. That's about as likely to happen as Tony Blair saying 'sorry'.
Adrian
Reply to
anonymous
Agreed (except for 'very long run' comment), if one omits the jackpots, the odds become more dismal. On the other hand it is jackpots and big prizes that pull the punters in. A lotto organiser sets the prize range for largest aggregate appeal and this means big prizes.
If someone wants better 'small prize' odds, the local betting shop (or TAB, PMU etc in other countries) is happy to oblige.
Reply to
peterwn

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