Where to invest cash other than in equities at the moment

I'm currently holding around 30K within a SIPP with Hargreaves Lansdown at the moment as cash. I also have approx 10K as cash with a Hargreaves Lansdown Stocks and shares ISA and I also have approx 30k as a cash on deposit that I'm looking to invest.
Back in the spring I had all of the above ready to invest into equities. Due to a sudden change in circumstances I just didn't have the time to sit down and go through the paperwork to make this go ahead. I'm now absolutely kicking myself as the markets have got up very well and I would be a good deal richer if I had gone ahead and invested when I planned to.
I'm looking to invest the above funds (SIPP, stocks & shares ISA and cash deposit into equities when the market (has hopefully fallen). In the meantime I'm at a loss as to what to do with the money.
I've moved my cash deposit into a high interest online account with ING (3.3%). The cash I'm holding within the SIPP and stocks and shares ISA I'm not sure what to do with it as the rate of interest on cash in the HL online account pays next to nothing.
I've been looking through all of the Hargreaves Lansdown Funds and I thought one of the Money Market funds would be most suitable i.e. Henderson Cash, Premier Money Market. Another option would be to put the money into fixed interest but I know next to nothing about how fixed interest works and whether it is suitable for a short term investment.
Any comments or suggestions would be welcome. (I've made my mind up not to invest into equities until the market has dipped). This isn't too important with the pension as I'm taking a long term view on that but when investing my cash deposit I will try and get in at the right time
Regards
Money Biz
Reply to
Money Biz
Hello,
You have a sound idea on investing at the right time on the downturn. I think you should look at investing with derivatives. They are like super cars of the finance world, and you can get gains much faster than investing with stocks regardless of the market going up or down. This is a great way to protect against the financial downturn as you can get gains while the market it going down. This is not something bankers will normally tell you about.
My name is Russell. I am Finance-educated and Wall Street - trained. The knowledge I gained while working on Wall Street in an investment bank, membership the trading division in which is by invitation only, is normally reserved only for the privileged investment banking clients who get access to extremely valuable and highly confidential information. Now I am using my Wall Street small investment bank expertise to help smaller investors; I trade with success and at times make as much as 10-20% a day off my investments. I might be able to team up so we could both benefit from my experience and the opportunities in the market. What I would recommend you do is start small and put a part of your investment in derivatives and see how well it does. You can give me a call or e-mail me, and I can help you decide what the best investment strategy would be for you. My number is 347-664-3420 in the US. Good luck!
Sincerely, Russell
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Reply to
Russell I

Cor.
Wow.
This all sounds too good to be true.
But this comes as a huge surprise. I was almost sure you'd be based in somewhere like Ghana.
Reply to
Ronald Raygun
In message , Ronald Raygun writes
Not really Cor I would have said more Wow!
So if we give him our money on a Monday morning he will give us back twice as much by Friday evening. As you say this sounds (almost) too good to be true.
Of course if he just had US100 and did it with his own money in less than four weeks he would be a billionaire and could then just live off of the interest..
Reply to
Paul Harris
"Paul Harris" wrote
NO! - look closer at what he said : notice the phrases "at times" & "as much as". He might make 10-20% on one of the days of that week, but could lose 50% on one/more of the other days!
"Paul Harris" wrote
Eh? Even 20% every day for four weeks on US100 would only give US16,500!!
Reply to
Tim
"Ronald Raygun" wrote
That would be *over* 4 months, not "less than four" as he said!
Reply to
Tim
In message , Ronald Raygun writes
Sorry, as you say that should have been months as I was only looking at an average of a mere 15% a day which is still not a bad investment for a retirement fund (if you believe him).
Of course in the real world (as has been pointed out) investments can go down as well as up.
Reply to
Paul Harris
In message , Tim writes
OK it wasn't meant as that much of a serious suggestion for you to invest in but just to clarify then how many days do you think it would take at 15% compound?
Reply to
Paul Harris

That would depend on how many "working" days (a bit of a woolly concept in this context -- perhaps I shouldn't have introduced it) there are in a month.
The Lord only rests one day a week, so I don't see why our money should get two days off. :-) If our money works 6 days a week, 15 weeks would suffice.
Reply to
Ronald Raygun

It would take 116 days. If the investment compounds 7 days a week, you're right, that would also be just less than 4 months.
Reply to
Ronald Raygun
In message , Ronald Raygun writes
That's what I thought, but perhaps I should have considered that it might only be traded five days a week.
Reply to
Paul Harris

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