Lottery Fraud nay Theft

anonymous wrote:


My impression is that the terminals are always online and that the barcodes don't actually directly code the number selections.
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David Woolley wrote:

I meant for someone wanting to check their numbers without relying on the honesty of shop assistants.
I don't have definitive knowledge, and I'd welcome corrections from those in the know, but my understanding is that lottery terminals buffer up their transactions then send them to Camelot at frequent, regular intervals. There seems to be an arbitrary 7.30pm cutoff, after which you can't buy any lottery tickets, not even for draws later in the week, and I suspect that Camelot use that time to download updates to the terminals. There doesn't seem to be a similar curfew for on-line purchases.
Reports of various failed attempts at fraud suggest that the barcodes do encrypt the chosen numbers, together with the date and time and location of the purchase.
Camelot know where and when in the Stevenage/Hitchin area the ticket was sold corresponding to the unclaimed £63 million Euromillions prize, but even though the 30 day limit for claiming for a lost ticket has elapsed, it's their policy not to identify the specific retailer until the last moment before the time limit for claims expires.
Adrian
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On Sat, 04 Aug 2012 12:55:31 +0100, David Woolley

That is correct. IIUC, the barcodes on the tickets are a unique code for the ticket itself which is looked up online on the main lottery computer's database. It prevents anyone from printing out a fraudulent winning ticket because nobody will be able to discover what number is associated with the winning ticket(s).
I'm not sure whether there is any meaningful data in the barcode - such as time, date and/or place of purchase etc.
--
Cynic



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On Sat, 4 Aug 2012 10:11:58 +0100, "tim....."

ISTM that all any retailer who intends to commit such fraud would need to do is have a losing ticket available out of sight, and feed that into the machine while the customer is present. He can then check the customer's ticket visually, and to be safe present any winning tickets to different outlets to claim the prizes.
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tim..... wrote:

W H Smith now print tickets on ordinary till rolls. I haven't had a win on one of those (I use a web site to check the numbers), but I doubt they are physically transported through the lottery terminal, when being checked.
Also, in this case, the shop assistant could look at the ticket and say: sorry, no win, I'll throw it in the bin for you.
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legroups.com...

-------------------------

ter

Easy.. Camelot should provide EVERY winner witha receipt to showe how much they have won.
They don't, so the shoip is free to steal deom £5 ro 5,000,000 whenever they want to chance it. The big prize fraud will get found out straight away, most small prize theft will go undetected.
A corner shop can make £5000 per annum easily by stealing the small prizes, thanks to Camelot's lack of care of the customer.
Turk182
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