backup"" /> backup"" />

automatically or command line version of "file > backup"

i am trying to integrate an automatic approach for some lazy clients of
mine who don't want to do "file > backup" or do the quickbooks online
backup services. anyways, maybe someone here has had success with
having some command line interface to do a backup for a company.. or i
searched through the archives and found people kept mentioning about
automatically backup on exit... using qb2002 (us edition if it
matters) and i cannot find this preference setting anywhere.. that
would be fine too.. i could tell the client just close out of qb and
start it back up (thus creating the backup)...
thanks,
kyle
Reply to
kyle
By then version 2007 will be out. I personally would want the latest and greatest not last years model.
Reply to
Allan Martin
You won't need to wait that long. 2007 can be ordered online right now at
formatting link
or through a Pro Advisor. It will be a few weeks before it hit the stores.
Reply to
Laura
awesome. ok. one more question: will i be shooting myself in the foot if i get 2007 now, convert, and keep up to date in qb2007.. and then at the end of the year, when i give an accountant's copy to an accountant (this is my first yr in business, dont have an accountant yet), s/he not be able to open it.. or would any accountant worth a hoot have qb2007 by then?
kyle
Reply to
kyle
That is a valid concern. You would have to find an accountant that had 2007 *IF* they wanted to open your file. It depends on the accountant. For two of my clients all the cpa wants at year end is the I/S and B/S. I never sent them a file but they probably trusted that the entries were okay.
Reply to
Laura
Don't you mean the latest un-tested, bug-ridden, calamity which will force a further upgrade next year?
I would rather buy last years (or the year befores) model at a knockdowwn price after it had had 12+ months of rigorous "in the field" testing and the majority of issues had been resolved!
Reply to
GymRatZ
Don't judge your accountant by their ability to open up your QB file. You can always print out the reports needed.
Not knowing anything about your business, you may not be ready (financially) to pay for an accountant to open up your QuickBooks file.
Reply to
Allan Martin
Well, while your sitting on your arse with some old fossel software I will having all the fun. Any who, when one makes their living from software consulting they can't wait 12+ months.
Reply to
Allan Martin
No Laura they don't trust that the entries were okay, trust me on this I have been a CPA in public practice for a long time.
When a CPA only wants to see the I/S and B/S it may be because the client is only willing to pay for rock bottom service. Either that, or the client does not know any better and the accountant can do a wham bam thank you very much.
Just think how sweet it is. Alll the accountant has to do at the end of the year is slap the numbers from the I/S and B/S onto a tax return program and in one hour generate 1,500 in fees.
Reply to
Allan Martin
allan,
my business is consulting -- army of one, s-corp -- so it is definitely profitable (averaging about 160-180hrs a month). it is also definitely small. i had an initial consultation with one cpa and he said it would be about $800 for the year. it seemed a bit high to me considering other consultants i know pay about half that (who live in other states -- i live in florida). can you enlighten me as to how the cpa for $800 is going to do a better job filing out tax forms from my QB printouts than the $400 guy? my expenses are all straight forward -- airfare, lodging, car rental, software, etc. what can the $800 (we'll call him "one of the best in the sector") do differently than the $400 guy (we'll call him "the mediocre one in the sector")
kyle
Reply to
kyle
Valid point. And given all the problems folks had with 2006 when it first came out, I would not be surprised if there are not problems with 2007 especially with the new Google desktop integration.
Reply to
Laura
Well, if your consulting rates are around 85/hour thats about 175,000 gross. I will not be be organizing any collections for you.
As for fees, dollar amounts have no meaning without reference to the type of services to be rendered. There are many instances where the 400.00 guy will make a larger profit from you than the one charging 800.00.
Preparing corporate federal and state returns plus a personal return for 800.00 is dirt cheap, at 400.00 grease up and bend over.
Reply to
Allan Martin
i guess i was trying to compare apples to apples. let's say the $400 guy and the $800 guy are filing the same forms for the s-corp-- corporate fed, (does florida need state filed?) and personal return.. let's say it was $2000 and $800 for a better point. what can the $2000 guy do for my small little s-corp that the $800 guy probably won't do or care to mention (he'll just file the forms and say good day).
Reply to
kyle
One more thing. When you use expressions like "my small little s-corp", you are saying that your not important.
Reply to
Allan Martin
For purposes of comparison, I send a QB backup to my CPA-Attorney person (note she's a lawyer in addition to being a CPA) along with a check for $550.
I get back about 150 pages of tax returns (both federal and state) for a C-Corp, along with supporting documents and schedules. I sign the forms and mail 'em away.
I also get a list of journal entries to account for depreciation, etc.
Unless your "best in the sector" is an attorney, he's not, by definition, the "best in the sector." Not that there's necessarily any practical difference between a CPA-only and a lawyer, but that certificate on the wall attesting that so-and-so is "admitted to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States" (along with other bits of paper) adds a cache to the signature on the return. Also, an attorney can never snitch you out; CPAs (only) can be compelled -- using a technique called 'waterboarding' -- to divulge your secrets.
One of my clients (in Florida), some years ago, got audited. The IRS then sent him a bill for almost $250,000(!).
I referred him to a member of the same club/organization to which my tax advisor belongs and my client contacted a local member of that group.
The lawyer came to my client's store, looked over the returns at issue and "I know this auditor. He normally audits automobile dealerships that sell $50,000 cars to drug dealers for cash. Not to worry; I'm gonna make all this go away." He did. Three weeks later my friend got a revised notification from the IRS for a paltry $3,000. He paid the lawyer $5,000. Oh, yeah. In addition to this fix, the lawyer got my friend's local property taxes reduced from over $10,000/year to about $3500.
The moral is, if you are a business doing $9 million a year in sales, don't use an accountant whose next biggest customer is a barber-shop.
Reply to
HeyBub
"I know this auditor. He
Most people go to a familly practitioner first, and then when their chests have to be cut open and a new heart put in they call upon the services of a specilist. The same is true for business services. The accountant that handles your year end tax work does not not have to be "admitted to practice before the Supreme Court".
My neighbor and his wife walked into a local CPA's office last year and the wife began to choke on a chicken bone. The CPA performed the Hymlick manuver and saved her life. I bet your lawyer friend would have let her drop dead and then file a suit against KFC.
Reply to
Allan Martin

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